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Bacterial Wilt on pumpkin/gourd leaves


Interveinal chlorosis andthen necrosis on pumpkin leaves (both photos) following systemic infection with Erwinia tracheiphila, the cause of bacterial wilt.
Photos courtesy of T.A. Zitter, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY



Drought symptoms on pumpkin leaves. Note the lack of the signature interveinal yellowing and green veins evident in leaves affected with Bacterial Wilt.
Photo courtesy of T.A. Zitter, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY


Stunted, tufted growth at nodes of pumpkin plants (in all 3 photos).
Photo courtesy of T.A. Zitter, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY


Interveinal chlorosis & necrosis not as distinct as seen on pumpkin.
Photo courtesy of T.A. Zitter, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY

Cucumber beetle adults feeding on leaves.
Photo courtesy of M.P. Hoffmann, Cornell University

Blossoms of mature plant can be damaged by cucumber beetles.
Photo courtesy of M.P. Hoffmann, Cornell University


The holes in this pumpkin leaf due to feeding by cucumber beetles are associated with early symptoms of bacterial wilt, which are the brown, dead tissue and the yellowish green, wilted leaf tissue.
Photo courtesy of M.T. McGrath, Long Island Horticultural Research and Extension Center