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Phytophthora on pumpkin/gourd fruit

Yeast-like appearance of the sporulation of Phytophthora on the pumpkin surface.
Photo courtesy of T.A. Zitter, Cornell University,Ithaca, NY



Phytophthora blight has caused total loss of this pumpkin crop.
Photo courtesy of M.T. McGrath, Long Island Horticultural Research and Extension Center

Fruit rot, a symptom of Phytophthora blight, most often begins on the part of a fruit in contact with the ground, which makes it difficult to control this disease with protectant fungicides.
Photo courtesy of M.T. McGrath, Long Island Horticultural Research and Extension Center


Early water-soaked lesion of Phytophthora fruit rot, which is one symptom of Phytophthora blight, as shown on pumpkin.
Photo courtesy of M.T. McGrath, Long Island Horticultural Research and Extension Center

First indication of sporulation on an early, water-soaked lesion of Phytophthora fruit rot (blight).
Photo courtesy of M.T. McGrath, Long Island Horticultural Research and Extension Center

Symptoms of Phytophthora fruit rot (blight) appearing symmetrically around a rotten stem suggest the fruit became infected systemically from the vine.
Photo courtesy of M.T. McGrath, Long Island Horticultural Research and Extension Center

Fruit affected by Phytophthora fruit rot (blight) with typical white, yeast-like fungal growth. Symptoms usually start on the fruit bottom and progress around the fruit until it is covered with fungal growth and collapses. Phytophthora fruit rot could be confused with Pythium fruit rot or white mold ; however, growth of Phytophthora is never fluffy or cottony.
Photo courtesy of M.T. McGrath, Long Island Horticultural Research and Extension Center

Mature fruit of pumpkin varieties producing fruit with hard, gourd-like rinds are less susceptible to Phytophthora fruit rot (blight) than fruit with conventional (softer) rinds; however, immature fruit are similarly susceptible because they all have soft rinds.
Photo courtesy of M.T. McGrath, Long Island Horticultural Research and Extension Center
Phytophthora blight beginning to develop in and along a driveway where soil was compacted from tractors and other equipment. Compacted soil does not drain well, thus conditions favoring disease onset (soil saturated with water) are more likely to occur in driveways.
Photo courtesy of M.T. McGrath, Long Island Horticultural Research and Extension Center
Normal irrigation practices usually do not promote development of Phytophthora blight; however, leaks, such as occurred at the end of this pipe, can cause soil to become saturated which provides favorable conditions.
Photo courtesy of M.T. McGrath, Long Island Horticultural Research and Extension Center
Phytophthora photo1CUCURBIT:Phytophthora Blight (Phytophthora capsici)
Photo 1 courtesy of M.T. McGrath, Long Island Horticultural Research and Extension Center

Phytophthora photo 2
CUCURBIT:Phytophthora Blight (Phytophthora capsici)
Photo courtesy of T.A. Zitter, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY

Photo courtesy of T.A. Zitter, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY


Photo courtesy of T.A. Zitter, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY


Phytophthora on mini pumpkin gourd
Photo courtesy of T.A. Zitter, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY